Afropolitan

A flood of solidarity with Palestine →

(Source: socialismartnature)


maarnayeri:

So this photo, much to my astonishment, has been circulating on various social media networks to incite an emotional response out of people to the plight of Palestinians. There are a couple issues with this.
America is a settler colonial state. And no, this is not something of the past. Many people, including activists unfortunately, often portray the suffering of Indigenous communities as something that is not rooted in the present. Its not a reality that doesn’t have adverse affects on Indigenous communities currently. Trafficking on reservations is a reality. Mass impoverishment and skyrocketing prices and in turn, lacking access to food in Indigenous communities is a reality. Violence and continued colonization is a grounded and apparently a neglected social justice issue.
This parallel, whether or not it intends to, is crudely neglectful of that. To assume the vast majority of settlers in the US would exude empathy for Palestinians and their stolen land and the ghettoization, if not demolishment of their homes is to assume that they would also then be actively committed to addressing and deconstructing the oppression faced by NDN communities, which is patently false.
Since America in itself is an illegitimate state, the upheaval of the US should not be threatening to anyone who considers themselves a decolonial activist. This photo pretty much says “imagine Americans, if this happened to your country”, but this isn’t our country. None of this is our land to begin with, aside from Indigenous and Black American communities, who have felt the backlash and served as the main and direct recipients of US violence for hundreds of years. No one living in America who does not descend from the genocided and the trafficked should feel the entitlement to and comfort of this land and living here that this infograph would require one to.
How can we expect those that have been here and were the first to experience US bred brutality to feel empathy with us if we are not willing to extend genuine solidarity and exhibit constant conscientiousness of their struggle? I believe in Muslim communities and that we’re able to have a more nuanced and inclusive approach than this. We can’t denounce settler neglect elsewhere while perpetuating it ourselves, which is precisely what this photo did. That’s not activism, that’s exploitation.
View Larger

maarnayeri:

So this photo, much to my astonishment, has been circulating on various social media networks to incite an emotional response out of people to the plight of Palestinians. There are a couple issues with this.

America is a settler colonial state. And no, this is not something of the past. Many people, including activists unfortunately, often portray the suffering of Indigenous communities as something that is not rooted in the present. Its not a reality that doesn’t have adverse affects on Indigenous communities currently. Trafficking on reservations is a reality. Mass impoverishment and skyrocketing prices and in turn, lacking access to food in Indigenous communities is a reality. Violence and continued colonization is a grounded and apparently a neglected social justice issue.

This parallel, whether or not it intends to, is crudely neglectful of that. To assume the vast majority of settlers in the US would exude empathy for Palestinians and their stolen land and the ghettoization, if not demolishment of their homes is to assume that they would also then be actively committed to addressing and deconstructing the oppression faced by NDN communities, which is patently false.

Since America in itself is an illegitimate state, the upheaval of the US should not be threatening to anyone who considers themselves a decolonial activist. This photo pretty much says “imagine Americans, if this happened to your country”, but this isn’t our country. None of this is our land to begin with, aside from Indigenous and Black American communities, who have felt the backlash and served as the main and direct recipients of US violence for hundreds of years. No one living in America who does not descend from the genocided and the trafficked should feel the entitlement to and comfort of this land and living here that this infograph would require one to.

How can we expect those that have been here and were the first to experience US bred brutality to feel empathy with us if we are not willing to extend genuine solidarity and exhibit constant conscientiousness of their struggle? I believe in Muslim communities and that we’re able to have a more nuanced and inclusive approach than this. We can’t denounce settler neglect elsewhere while perpetuating it ourselves, which is precisely what this photo did. That’s not activism, that’s exploitation.


white nonsense - the top 10 hits →

processedlives:

sielunmaisema:

owning-my-truth:

atane:

zemo:

atane:

When you write about race, the feedback and messages white people send you ends up being the same. They all have the same tired retorts. They desperately need to get new material.

Here are the top 10 hits of white nonsense. There are many more examples, but these are the top 10 imo.

1. Not all…

The mentioning of Eastern Europeans here is disrespectful. Considering how many different conquering armies have stomped over the Polish, Ukrainians, etc. over time, there is no need to utilize them as a prop in a “not all…, lol” argument. especially when it’s so clear that the person that would claim Eastern Europeans didn’t participate in imperialism is already doing exactly that.

Everything else I agree with.

I think something is lost in translation here. Let me elaborate.  

I definitely was not using Eastern Europeans as a prop! I mentioned them because it is a very real tactic and ongoing theme people use to derail conversations and topics I write about or bring up. It happens all the time. When I mean all the time, I mean all the time. I could be talking about European colonialism in Africa or the history of white majority rule in Southern African countries, and then someone will message me about Eastern Europeans like I have somehow condemned them. Of course I did no such thing, but they love to play this game and put words in my mouth. It is a diversion.

Sometimes people will bring up Eastern Europeans completely randomly to me. The other day I wrote this post about how when Nigerians die, there is never a concrete number of the casualties. Someone wrote in a reply asking “what about Ukraine people?" Did that have any relevance to what I was talking about? Absolutely not. Just like if I’m talking about the British Empire and their brutal colonialism and white supremacy, someone will message me about Eastern Europe to tell me "not all white people".

This is what I’m talking about. I hope I’ve made myself clear. I’m not disrespecting Eastern Europeans.

Thank you.

How ironic that on a post about white nonesense a white person responds… with UTTER nonesense. Truly unbelievable. I’m constantly floored by how incredibly narcissistic white people can be, incredibly high on their white privilege and the power of white supremacy. Everything must be centered around them. And the fact that Atane MENTIONED that white people love to derail using the Eastern European argument -which he did not mention in a disrespectful manner by the way at all as he is very conscious of the differential histories and power dynamics etc. (see above)- and then to watch a white person comes along and says the SAME thing. Just wow.

White people never cease to amaze me. 

I’ve been wanting to reply to this post awhile now, but it’s difficult since I have next to no sources to back me up on this (despite studying Russian and Polish). But in regards of “East Europeans didn’t do what West Europeans did”:

First of all, I’d like to say that although East Europe is not synonymous to Russia, Russia brutally colonized Siberia from 16th century onwards, and murdered most of the indigenous people living there, and all European nations under Russian/Soviet regime or influence have participated in it and continue to do so. There is no question about weather or not natural resources stolen from Siberia benefit modern day Russians, and us Finns, and the part Siberian oil and gas play in Ukrainian and Belarusian politics as well as EU politics is huge. People tend to forget that this is exploitation of indigenous lands, because apparently Russia has hidden and destroyed historical records of how Siberia came to be a part of the country.

Second of all, for an European nation to participate in imperialism it was not necessary to have your own colony or be independent. There is for instance some Polish population in Brazil, whose ancestors moved there with Russian passports in the 19th century. This means that those people participated in the colonization, thus Polish people participated in the imperialism. I’m sure that of each East European nation there are examples of people moving to colonized lands to “find better life”, and that better life was built on colonialism, white supremacy, stealing and exploitation of indigenous lands and natural resources and slavery.

Products from colonized lands such as coffee, tea and spices were and are sold in East Europe too, so people who stayed home benefitted also. This is so fucking obvious I don’t know why I even have to say it.

People tend to forget that colonialism was an all European project, and the ideology behind it was “common knowledge” in pretty much every part of this continent, and still is if you look at the large racist political movements and the inhumane immigration policy we have for instance. People from all over Europe went to work to colonies or moved there for good, people went as missionaries, engineers, sailors, explorers, farmers etc. It didn’t matter that the country you lived in didn’t have it’s own colonies: Finnish engineers worked in Belgian Kongo for instance, and Finnish farmers moved to North America (as Swedes and as Finns). Again I’m sure that similar examples can be found in the histories of different East European countries, if you know what to look for.

I honestly don’t believe that there is a nation in Europe that didn’t participate in the imperialism (unless you can prove it with large amounts of as unbiased research as possible). It is far more likely that everyone participated enthusiastically, despite of being under foreign rule or at war with your neighbors. Everyone wanted to be a colonialist, East and West Europeans alike, but some had more opportunities than others.

I think this is a case of East Europeans believing, much like us Finns, that we didn’t participate in the colonialism because it’s never spoken about or not explicitly stated in history books, or that even if we did participate we weren’t “as bad”. Also it might be the case of historical records talking about people as “Russians” or “Austrians” or “Swedish” or something else because the modern country didn’t exist yet or was under foreign rule, or people had emigrated from there to West Europe (which was kind of popular amongst upper class East Europeans).

Also I really don’t like the way in which certain parts of the history of Poland and Ukraine, albeit sad and violent, are used to prove a completely different matter. Being under Russian rule didn’t stop Polish people from moving to Brazil and Ukrainian cossacks probably participated in the colonization of Siberia even though they might have been considered Russian at time.

Call me disrespectful all you want but I feel like actually people who say “not East Europeans!” don’t know enough about their own history and the ways in which they benefit from colonialism and white supremacy, and use unrelated historical facts to shut up people who disagree with them, or to make sure that they get special treatment as “white people who were nicer than the rest”. Or I dunno “white people who are super oppressed by everyone”, like some Finns claim for some reason (??????). European power dynamics aside, white East Europeans do have white privilege that is built on colonialism and in my opinion things that people of color say about white people are very, very likely to be true for East European white people as well.

^^^^^^

White folks who say “not East Europeans!” should read up on the Couronian colonization of the Americas. Even Switzerland, a landlocked country, mind you, participated in the colonization of the Americas. So, yeah… *not ALL White people.* Just a huge majority of White people that renders the very few who didn’t negligible.


Until feminists are aware of the state’s involvement in protecting patriarchy as a system of power, much in the same way it protects capitalism and racism as systems, feminists will be unable to see why a reform politics, though necessary, is insufficient.

— Zillah Eisenstein (via postcolonialfeminist)


Ivy Taylor becomes the first African American mayor of San Antonio

daniellemertina:

forbeginnersbooks:

image

Congratulations to Ivy Taylor, who was elected this week and made history as the first ever African American mayor of San Antonio, Texas! On Tuesday Taylor announced her plans to improve the city, and said, “I’ve always been committed to working with everyone in our community, even though we may not always agree on every issue.” 

And of course she’s a Delta :) 


dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: “Anita: Speaking Truth to Power.”

Recently watched this powerful and compelling documentary about Anita Hill and the sexual assault case where she provided testimony against Judge Clarence Thomas who was then nominated for the US Supreme Court.

At the time Hill, who was a former employee of Thomas’ (who shamefully called the proceedings a case of ‘high-tech lynching’ as a way to deflect from the issue of sexual harassment by using race as a factor - the only factor), was a law professor at the University of Oklahoma where she grew up. She gave her testimony live on national television in October 1991 and, unbeknownst to her, the effect of her decision to speak out would almost immediately spark what the Boston Globe called, “a passionate debate about sexual harassment in the workplace and elsewhere”, and one that is far from over.

In a world where gender and racial oppression are systemic, and where victims are blamed and perpetrators shielded by the oppressive and shaming nature of rape culture, Anita Hill’s story remains both relevant and necessary in its telling. What’s I found particularly interesting about the film is how director Freida Mock conveyed this story in such a way that made it both Anita’s story and that of so many women in the United States and around the world.

Hill, now a professor and Brandeis University, has dedicated much of her life to speaking about sexual harassment and gender issues, as well as how these matters often intersect with race, as well as helping others find their voice. 

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud

So, when and where can I see this movie?